Dissociative Amnesia

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Overview

The predominant disturbance of dissociative amnesia is one or more episodes of inability to recall important personal information, usually of a traumatic or stressful nature, that is too extensive to be explained by ordinary forgetfulness.

The disturbance does not occur exclusively during the course of dissociative identity disorder, dissociative fugueposttraumatic stressdisorder, acute stress disorder, or somatization disorder and is not due to the direct physiological effects of a substance (e.g., a drug of abuse, a medication) or a neurological or other general medical condition (e.g., amnestic disorder due to head trauma).

The symptoms cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.

Sub-Specifier: Dissociative Amnesia with Dissociative Fugue

This occurs when an individual travels or wanders, either in a seemingly purposeful or bewildered fashion, without knowing who they are. Dissociative fugue involves amnesia of a person’s entire identity or for other important autobiographical information.

 

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